Thoughts about CRM, from Whistler

…and in the context of the Mozilla Learning Strategy.

Obligatory photo of Whistler mountains
Another obligatory photo of the mountains

Mozilla recently held a coincidental work week in Whistler Village.

I knew this would be a busy week when the primary task for MoFo across teams was to ‘Dig into our relationships goal‘.

  1. Relationships‘ meant a lot of talk about relationship management (aka CRM).
  2. Goal‘ meant a lot of talk about metrics.

Between these two topics, my calendar was fully booked long before I landed in Canada.

My original plan was to avoid booking any meetings, and be more flexible about navigating the week. But that wasn’t possible. This is a noticeable change for me in how people want to talk about metrics and data. A year ago, I’d be moving around the teams at a work-week nudging others to ask ‘do you want to talk about metrics?’. This week in contrast was back-to-back sessions requested by many others.

We also spent a lot of time together talking about the Mozilla Learning Strategy. And this evolving conversation is feeding back into my own thinking about delivering CRM to the org.

Where I had been thinking about how to design a central service that copes with the differences between all the teams, what I actually need to focus on is the things that are the same across teams.

I’m not designing many CRMs for many teams, but instead a MoFo CRM that brings together many teams.

I’m not actually giving this post enough writing time to add the context for some readers, but that small change in framing is important. And I think very positive.

Lastly, one other important lesson learned: Pay attention to time-zones and connecting flights when booking your travel, or you’ll end up sleeping in the airport.

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Working on CRM

I’m writing a couple of blog posts today. This first is a belated note about my work on CRM for MoFo, and how I ended up doing this.

Slides from my presentation to MoFo on our All Staff call in June.

In the second quarter of the year, my Metrics work was pretty quiet while we were prototyping the new Webmaker Android App, and the Learning Networks team was in planning mode for Mozilla Clubs. There was some strategic work to do, but at this stage in the product life-cycle, data-driven decision making isn’t a useful tool. I never actually ran out of things to do, but was keen to spend my time on things that had the most impact.

So I was looking around for projects to help with. Talking to David Ascher, I explained that the projects that engaged me most were the complex ones that combined the needs and views of many different teams. This was also a moment of realisation for me that this was true of every job I’ve held. I like connecting things, including differing points of view.

The MoFo CRM project has been on the table(s) for a while now, but it never gained momentum for legitimate organisational reasons. All our teams needed some form of CRM, but even those with the biggest requirements didn’t have spare capacity to supply CRM tools to the rest of the teams. The more a team tried to coordinate with others, the more complex it was to solve for their own use case. It was everyone’s problem, and no-one’s problem.

So my proposal was to have a ‘product manager’ to look after CRM as an internal service to the org; Centralise ownership of the complexity rather than making it everyone’s problem. That way teams can think about the benefits of using the CRM rather than the complexity of building it. And after reviewing the plan with our Ops leadership, I picked up this task.

It’s been a couple of month’s since then, and I’ve had hundreds of hours of conversations with people across Mozilla about CRM. The project is living up to my request of ‘complex’, but I’m also pleased we’ve started doing the work. Although CRM includes more than it’s fair share of ‘Enterprise IT’, we’re keeping our workflow inline with the agile methods we apply to our own products and projects.

But it’s a difficult project to track, with many plates that need to keep spinning. I noticed this most after being offline with my family for two weeks then coming back to work. It took me a few days to get up to speed on each of the CRM pieces. So this week I’ve been working on documentation that’s easier to follow.

The project is now split into seven projects, and the current status of each, and the next steps with links to github issues for tracking and discussion can now all be found in one place. Building on Matt Thomson’s hard work organizing many Mozilla things, I’m using this wiki/etherpad combo as my working doc: CRM Plan of Record.