What I see in these graphs of Github contribution

Context: Last week I shared a few graphs (1, 2, 3, 4) looking at data from our repositories on Github, extracted using this Gitribution app thing, as part of our work to dashboard contributor numbers for the Mozilla Foundation. I didn’t comment on the graphs at the time because I wanted time for others to look at them without my opinions skewing what they might see. This follow up post is a walk-through of some things I see in the graphs/data. The real value in looking at data is finding ways to make things better by challenging ourselves, and being honest about what the numbers show, so this will be as much about questions as answers… Also, publishing this last week flagged up some missing repositories and identified some other members of staff so these graphs are based on the … Continue reading »

Contribution Graphs part 4: Contributions by Contributors over time

I’m posting a quick series of these without much comment on my part as I’d love to know what you see in each of them. This is looking at activity in Github (commits and issues), for the repositories listed here. It’s an initial dive into the data, so don’t be afraid to ask questions of it, or request other cuts of this. In the not so distant future, we’ll be able to look at this kind of data across our combined contribution activities, so this is a bit of a taster. Click for the full-size images. Contributions by Contributors over time Last but not least for today, I think there are some stories in this one… Is anything here a surprise? What do you see in this?

Contribution Graphs part 3: Distribution of contributions

I’m posting a quick series of these without much comment on my part as I’d love to know what you see in each of them. This is looking at activity in Github (commits and issues), for the repositories listed here. It’s an initial dive into the data, so don’t be afraid to ask questions of it, or request other cuts of this. In the not so distant future, we’ll be able to look at this kind of data across our combined contribution activities, so this is a bit of a taster. Click for the full-size images. Distribution of contributions (excluding staff work) Here are a couple of ways of visualizing this same data. Is anything here a surprise? What do you see in this?

Contribution Graphs part 2: By hour of the day

I’m posting a quick series of these without much comment on my part as I’d love to know what you see in each of them. This is looking at activity in Github (commits and issues), for the repositories listed here. It’s an initial dive into the data, so don’t be afraid to ask questions of it, or request other cuts of this. In the not so distant future, we’ll be able to look at this kind of data across our combined contribution activities, so this is a bit of a taster. Click for the full-size images. By hour of the day Is anything here a surprise? What do you see in this?

Contribution Graphs part 1: Contributions over time

I’m posting a quick series of these without much comment on my part as I’d love to know what you see in each of them. This is looking at activity in Github (commits and issues), for the repositories listed here. It’s an initial dive into the data, so don’t be afraid to ask questions of it, or request other cuts of this. In the not so distant future, we’ll be able to look at this kind of data across our combined contribution activities, so this is a bit of a taster. Click for the full-size images. Contributions over time Broken down by teams Broken down further by repository Is anything here a surprise? What do you see in this?

Is being a member of the mozilla ‘organization’ on github a good proxy indicator of being staff?

Following on from the post about Gitribution, these are my notes around my initial exploration of the data extracted from Github. One of the challenges of counting volunteer contributors to Mozilla is working out who is a volunteer and who is paid-staff. The concept of a volunteer contributor in itself is full of complications, as paid staff will volunteer their free time on other projects they care about, and contributors become employees, or employees will work using their personal email addresses and so on. The fidelity of tracking that would be required to *perfectly* identify when someone does something on a ‘voluntary’ basis would not be proportionate to the impact this would have on the usefulness of the final reporting. So perfect tracking is not the goal here. My first pass at filtering out staff from contributor counts on github … Continue reading »

Gitribution

Over the last week or so I’ve been building a thing: Gitribution. It’s an attempt to understand contributions to Mozilla Foundation work that happen on Github. It’s not perfect yet, but it’s in a state to get feedback on now. Why did I build this? For these reasons (in this order): Counting: To extract counts of contributor numbers from Github across Foundation projects on an automated ongoing basis Testing: To demo the API format we need for other sources of data to power our interim contributor dashboard Learning: To learn a bit about node.js so I can support metrics work on other projects more directly when it’s helpful to (i.e. submitting pull-requests rather than just opening bugs) 1. Counting The data in this tool is all public data from the Github API, but it’s been restructured so it can be … Continue reading »