Remembering maps from memory

Today, I found this awesome post on Uncertain Cartographies (via Flowing Data), and it immediately took me back to something I made when I was in college and studying fine art.

So check out that link first, as this post will make more sense in relation to it, and it’s pretty fascinating anyway.

Then I’ll continue my reminiscence… :)

I used to have a framed print of a map I’d drawn on the wall at home, though when I say “print” it was ~10 bits of A4 photo paper I had carefully cut and glued together. It lasted about 6 years on the wall before the ink faded and the paper peeled and I had to take it down. And I hadn’t thought about this map again until today.

Then after reading this paragraph in particular, I really wanted to find my old map:

“Places where I once lived are deeply etched in my mind. Given a blank sheet of paper, and a little lenience, I can draw a respectable map of Murrays Bay, Mount Eden, Kingsland, Longburn, Summer Hill or Mana from memory. Yet most New Zealand localities are at once familiar and largely unknown to me.”

I went searching for my old map.

Amazingly (to me at least) I managed to find a copy of my original Photoshop artwork file on an old archive CD-R that’s followed me from desk to desk, between many house moves and a couple of countries and that I’ve not had any cause to look at until today.

I’ve posted the map below, but first here’s some context:

This was something I created 10 years ago when I was 18 and I’d been driving for less than a year. I didn’t really use maps for directions, but I drove quite a lot to play gigs with my band, and to visit my girlfriend (now wife) who was studying in Exeter. I knew my way around by which junctions led to where, but I’d never had to ‘map’ these places in a proper geographic context in my mind. This is pre-Google Maps/Earth (hence the AA roadmap styling) and it’s interesting now to think how the ability to browse maps so quickly and fluidly online shapes the way we visualize the abstraction of location in our minds. Even more so when you factor in navigation aids.

To create the map, I sat down with a pen and a large piece of paper and drew the roads leading out around me to all the places I had traveled in recent months. I didn’t allow edits or corrections, and there was no advanced sketching of where places were located. I drew the roads and made the links between places in one go. I did this until I ran out of roads I could meaningfully label. Scanned the whole thing in and traced the lines in Photoshop (no fixes allowed). I recall this “giant” file crashing my computer on a regular basis, though looking at it now, it’s only 50mb.

Anyway, that’s getting a bit nostalgic and I don’t mean it to. What I meant to do was post this map as a response to the thought provoking piece I read today.

A little insight into my earlier years
A little insight into my earlier years

 

 

Messing with Processing and a black hole

I put together a Sketch in Processing this evening. It generates a canvas at whatever size you want, adds a black hole and a couple of thousand pixels that get sucked into the black hole with some simulated gravity. The final result is a bit like the image I had in my head when I started, so I’m happy with that. I would like it to be more awesome, but this will do for the time I have to play with right now.

I quite like the scratchy ‘pixely’ quality at ‘actual’ size, but that might be my nostalgia for older games and my taste in scrappy painting.

The code’s available over at http://www.openprocessing.org/sketch/119499 where you can hit the page a few times and generate variations of the image.

blackhole

blackhole

blackhole2

Anyway, enough with this post as I should be doing some real studying now (which involves reading a play).