Messing with Processing and a black hole

I put together a Sketch in Processing this evening. It generates a canvas at whatever size you want, adds a black hole and a couple of thousand pixels that get sucked into the black hole with some simulated gravity. The final result is a bit like the image I had in my head when I started, so I’m happy with that. I would like it to be more awesome, but this will do for the time I have to play with right now. I quite like the scratchy ‘pixely’ quality at ‘actual’ size, but that might be my nostalgia for older games and my taste in scrappy painting. The code’s available over at http://www.openprocessing.org/sketch/119499 where you can hit the page a few times and generate variations of the image. Anyway, enough with this post as I should be doing some … Continue reading »

Critters Processing Sketch – Round 3

This is taking a little bit more shape now… Coming up next is user interaction.

Critters Processing Sketch – Part 2

I’m just posting some progress as this concept develops. Code etc is hosted on Open Processing if you want to have a look. I’m really enjoying Processing as a sketchbook for code. It’s definitely a good tool for teaching programming.

Critters Sketch in Processing

If your browser is up to scratch, here’s a little JavaScript based sketch from a current personal project… This is some early code for a simple game I’m working on for the Coursera Creative Programming course (it’s my first time building a game rather than regular software). These shapes are generated from a limited range of numbers, which can later be turned into a simple genetic code to define these critters. I’ve hosted this on OpenProcessing.org, so you can get to the source-code etc. http://www.openprocessing.org/sketch/103410

Pixel Art Impressionism for Threadless

Just a little design for this Threadless competition. Please vote if you can spare a minute. Impixelism    

On ‘We, the Web Kids’

I thoroughly enjoyed reading We, the Web Kids, and could probably have picked a quote from any paragraph to highlight it’s quality. But I’ve picked one in particular as it connects with one of the themes I’ve been writing around here for the last couple of weeks. That is: paying the artist. Like Piotr, I’m happy to pay for the art I love. And whether it’s a painting, sculpture, performance or book, I’d like to pay the artist as directly as possible. In this extract, he captures some of the motivations excellently: “Why should we pay for the distribution of information that can be easily and perfectly copied without any loss of the original quality? If we are only getting the information alone, we want the price to be proportional to it. We are willing to pay more, but then … Continue reading »