Mozilla Contributor Analysis Project (Joint MoCo & MoFo)

I’m  back at the screen after a week of paternity leave, and I’ll be working part-time for next two weeks while we settle in to the new family routine at home. In the meantime, I wanted to mention a Mozilla contributor analysis project in case people would like to get involved. We have a wiki page now, which means it’s a real thing. And here are some words my sleep-deprived brain prepared for you earlier today: — The goal and scope of the work: Explore existing contribution datasets to look for possible insights and metrics that would be useful to monitor on an ongoing basis, before the co-incident workweek in Portland at the beginning of December. We will: Stress-test our current capacity to use existing contribution data Look for actionable insights to support Mozilla-wide community building efforts Run ad-hoc analysis … Continue reading »

“Conclusions”

Removing the second sentence increases conversion rate (hypothesis = simplicity is good). The button text ‘Go!’ increased the conversion rate. Both variations on the headline increased conversion rate, but ‘Welcome to Webmaker’ performed the best. We should remove the bullet points on this landing page. The log-in option is useful on the page, even for a cold audience who we assume do not have accounts already. Repeating the ask ‘Sign-up for Webmaker’ at the end of the copy, even when it duplicates the heading immediately above, is useful. Even at the expense of making the copy longer. The button text ‘Create an account’ works better than ‘Sign up for Webmaker’ even when the headline and CTA in the copy are ‘Sign up for Webmaker’. These two headlines are equivalent. In the absence of other data we should keep the version … Continue reading »

The Power of Webmaker Landing Pages

We just started using our first webmaker.org landing page, and I thought I’d write about why this is so important and how it’s working out so far. Who’s getting involved? Every day people visit the webmaker.org website. They come from many places, for many reasons. Sometimes they know about Webmaker, but most of the time it’s new to them. Some of those people take an action; they sign-up to find out more, to make something with our tools, or even to throw a Maker Party. But, most of the people who visit webmaker.org don’t. The percentage of people who do take action is our conversion rate. Our conversion rate is an important number that can help us to be more effective. And being more effective is key to winning. If you’re new to thinking about our conversion rate, it can … Continue reading »

Gitribution

Over the last week or so I’ve been building a thing: Gitribution. It’s an attempt to understand contributions to Mozilla Foundation work that happen on Github. It’s not perfect yet, but it’s in a state to get feedback on now. Why did I build this? For these reasons (in this order): Counting: To extract counts of contributor numbers from Github across Foundation projects on an automated ongoing basis Testing: To demo the API format we need for other sources of data to power our interim contributor dashboard Learning: To learn a bit about node.js so I can support metrics work on other projects more directly when it’s helpful to (i.e. submitting pull-requests rather than just opening bugs) 1. Counting The data in this tool is all public data from the Github API, but it’s been restructured so it can be … Continue reading »

As ready as I’m going to be

Tomorrow is the first day in my new role at the Mozilla Foundation, and I’m getting the new job nerves and excitement now. Between wrapping up at WWF, preparing for Christmas, house hunting, and finishing off my next study assignment (a screenplay involving time-travel and a bus), I’ve been squeezing in a little bit of prep for the new job too. This post is basically a note about some of the things I’ve been looking at in the last couple of weeks. I thought it would be useful to jump through various bits of tech used in a number of MoFo projects, some of which I’d been wanting to play with anyway. This is not deep learning by any means, but it’s enough hands-on experience to speed up some things in the future. I setup a little node.js app locally … Continue reading »

Drawn: Multi-armed Bandit Experiments

I read this really interesting article on multi-armed bandit experiments the other day, and while I enjoyed the graphs and the stats, I got distracted wondering what a multi-armed bandit experiment would actually look like? So I had a go at drawing one last night.

Looking forward to playing with the new GA. Also waiting to see what reports have been taken out

Looking forward to playing with the new GA. Also waiting to see what reports have been taken out of the system. Fingers crossed that it’s nothing we use too much.