Weeknotes: 23 Jan 2015

I managed to complete roughly five of my eleven goals for the week. Made progress on (but have not cracked) daily task management for the newly evolving systems Caught up on some email from time off, but still a chunk left to work through Spent more time writing code than expected Illness this week slowed me down These aren’t very good weeknotes, but perhaps better than none.  

The week ahead: 19 Jan 2015

If all goes to plan, I will: Write a daily working process Use a public todo list, and make it work Catch up on more email from time off Ship V1 of Webmaker Metrics retention dashboard Work out a plan for aligning metrics work with dev team heartbeats Don’t let the immediate todo list get in the way of planning long term processes Invest time in working open Wrestle with multiple todo list systems until they (or I) work together nicely Survive a 5 day week (it’s been a while) Write up final testing blog posts from EOY before those tests are forgotten Book data practices kick-off meetings with all teams To try and solve some of the process challenges, I’ve gone back to a tool I built a couple of years ago (Done by When) and I’m breaking it … Continue reading »

From 2014 to 2015

I’ve had a couple of weeks off work and it’s been a good time to reflect on the year past, and the one ahead. And before I dive back into things on Friday morning, I wanted to get this post published. It’s a long one, and writing it was more for my benefit than yours On 2014 Cassie’s post on 2014 has claimed the perfect title already, but I’ll ditto that it was a hell of a year: New job, second baby, two house moves, one house purchase, one trip to Toronto, two to San Francisco, Mozfest in London, Mozlandia in Portland, finally finishing my degree and graduating, and continually adjusting our home-life around the amazing speed at which a two year old and a newborn can change in any 24 hour period. Some reflections: My job title might focus … Continue reading »

Fundraising testing update

I wrote a post over on fundraising.mozilla.org about our latest round of optimization work for our End of Year Fundraising campaign. We’ve been sprinting on this during the Mozilla all-hands workweek in Portland, which has been a lot of fun working face-to-face with the awesome team making this happen. You can follow along with the campaign, and see how were doing at fundraising.mozilla.org And of course, we’d be over the moon if you wanted to make a donation.

Will our latest donation form help us raise more money this year?

I posted to the fundraising.mozilla.org blog today: http://fundraising.mozilla.org/will-our-latest-donation-form-help-us-raise-more-money-this-year

#DALMOOC structure

I hesitantly post this, as I’m spending the evening looking at DALMOOC and hope to take part, but know I’m short on free time right now (what with a new baby and trying to buy a house) and starting the course late. This is either the first in a series of blog posts about this course, or, we shall never talk about this again. The course encourages open and distributed publishing of work and assessments, which makes answering this first ‘warm-up’ task feel like more of a commitment to the course than I can really make. But here goes… Competency 0.1: Describe and navigate the distributed structure of DALMOOC, different ways to engage with peers and various technologies to manage and share personal learning. DALMOOC offers and encourages learning experiences that span many online products from many providers but which … Continue reading »

Learning about Learning Analytics @ #Mozfest

If I find a moment, I’ll write about many of the fun and inspiring things I saw at Mozfest this weekend, but this post is about a single session I had the pleasure of hosting alongside Andrew, Doug and Simon; Learning Analytics for Good in the Age of Big Data. We had an hour, no idea if anyone else would be interested, or what angle people would come to the session from. And given that, I think it worked out pretty well. We had about 20 participants, and broke into four groups to talk about Learning Analytics from roughly 3 starting points (though all the discussions overlapped): Practical solutions to measuring learning as it happens online The ethical complications of tracking (even when you want to optimise for something positive – e.g. Learning) The research opportunities for publishing and connecting … Continue reading »

Mozilla Contributor Analysis Project (Joint MoCo & MoFo)

I’m  back at the screen after a week of paternity leave, and I’ll be working part-time for next two weeks while we settle in to the new family routine at home. In the meantime, I wanted to mention a Mozilla contributor analysis project in case people would like to get involved. We have a wiki page now, which means it’s a real thing. And here are some words my sleep-deprived brain prepared for you earlier today: — The goal and scope of the work: Explore existing contribution datasets to look for possible insights and metrics that would be useful to monitor on an ongoing basis, before the co-incident workweek in Portland at the beginning of December. We will: Stress-test our current capacity to use existing contribution data Look for actionable insights to support Mozilla-wide community building efforts Run ad-hoc analysis … Continue reading »

“Conclusions”

Removing the second sentence increases conversion rate (hypothesis = simplicity is good). The button text ‘Go!’ increased the conversion rate. Both variations on the headline increased conversion rate, but ‘Welcome to Webmaker’ performed the best. We should remove the bullet points on this landing page. The log-in option is useful on the page, even for a cold audience who we assume do not have accounts already. Repeating the ask ‘Sign-up for Webmaker’ at the end of the copy, even when it duplicates the heading immediately above, is useful. Even at the expense of making the copy longer. The button text ‘Create an account’ works better than ‘Sign up for Webmaker’ even when the headline and CTA in the copy are ‘Sign up for Webmaker’. These two headlines are equivalent. In the absence of other data we should keep the version … Continue reading »

Something special within ‘Hack the snippet’

Here are a couple of notes about ‘Hack the snippet‘ that I wanted to make sure got documented. It significantly changed peoples’ predisposition to Webmaker before they arrived on the site Its ‘post-interaction’ click-through-rate was equivalent to most one-click snippets Behind these observations, something special was happening in ‘Hack the snippet’. I can’t tell you exactly what it was that had the end-effect, but it’s worth remembering the effect. 1. It ‘warmed people up’ to Webmaker The ‘Hack the snippet’ snippet was shown to the same audience (Firefox users) as eight other snippet variations we ran during the campaign had the same % of users click through to the landing page had the same on-site experience on webmaker.org as all the other snippet variations we tested (the same landing page, sign-up ask etc) But when people who had interacted with … Continue reading »